Pentagon will not label Fort Hood shootings as terrorist attack

Posted on October 24, 2012

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By Susan Crabtree
washingtontimes
The Washington Times

Monday, October 22, 2012
Jeffrey F. Addicott, the director for Center for Terrorism Law at St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio, accused the Pentagon of “playing word games” just days before Monday night’s final debate between President Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney in which foreign policy was the main focus.

Acknowledging Maj. Hasan’s alleged shooting spree as a major terrorism attack on the homeland “destroys the administration’s narrative that al Qaeda is winding down” and there is a diminishing threat of a terrorist attack occurring on U.S. soil, Mr. Addicott said.

“This war against al Qaeda is not localized to Afghanistan and Pakistan — the problem here is that we have many people who are not members of al Qaeda but they are infected with the virus of radical Islam,” he said. “To say that Hasan was not motivated by radical Islamic extremism is absurd.”

But David Glazier, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and a former fellow at the Center for National Security Law, strongly disagreed.

Labeling the shootings workplace violence instead of terrorism, he said, “makes perfect sense” because it’s a simple cut-and-dried murder case without getting into the complexities of the military’s law of war and whether it’s appropriate to consider Maj. Hasan an unlawful combatant.

“The Department of Defense is being cautious but correct in proceeding with its case that this is an ordinary service member who is being prosecuted for a very serious crime,” he said. “A military individual pulls out a gun and shoots. It’s not necessary to get into motivation to prove that basic offense.”

Reclassifying the shootings as a terrorist attack, could very well reset the whole case as the defense tries to obstruct and delay as much as possible, he added.

Last week a coalition of 160 victims and family members in the deadly rampage at the military post in Killeen, Texas, nearly three years ago called on the administration to reclassify the attack as terrorism, citing the suspect’s ties to al Qaeda and his radical Islamist beliefs.

The assault at Fort Hood left 13 dead and more than 30 wounded by gunshots, and officially designating the attack as terrorism would make service-member victims eligible for Purple Heart medals, and, the victims say, grant them access to medical care and benefits similar to what soldiers wounded in Iraq or Afghanistan would receive.

In the past month, many of the Fort Hood victims watched the Obama administration’s changing statements about the attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi and apparent reticence to label the attack in Libya terrorism until weeks later and drew parallels to the government’s reaction to the assault in Texas.

Nearly three years after the shootings, several government and separate independent investigations uncovered evidence that the FBI knew Maj. Hasan was emailing with al-Awlaki before the shootings and did nothing to intervene.

According to authorities, Maj. Hasan also followed al-Awlaki’s advice to scream “Allah akbar” (“God is great”) to invoke fear before starting to shoot. Al-Awlaki was killed in 2011 by a drone airstrike in Yemen.

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